Butea superba (Thai red kwao krua) combats phytoestrogens in Californian men

Ihsan Ahmad As Saker, the victim. Killed for leaving Islam

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Take butea superba and tongkat ali extract daily for a few weeks, and feel the power of your mind. This is like LSD without hallucinations, and s total focus on the next orgasm, the greatest of a lifetime.

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Awake during surgery: 'I'm in hell'

When Carol Weiher was having her right eye surgically removed in 1998, she woke up hearing disco music. The next thing she heard was "Cut deeper, pull harder."

She desperately wanted to scream or even move a finger to signal to doctors that she was awake, but the muscle relaxant she'd received prevented her from controlling her movements.

"I was doing a combination of praying and pleading and cursing and screaming, and trying anything I could do but I knew that there was nothing that was working," said Weiher, of Reston, Virginia. Weiher is one of few people who have experienced anesthesia awareness. Although normally a patient does not remember anything about surgery that involves general anesthesia, about one or two people in every 1,000 may wake up during general anesthesia, according to the Mayo Clinic. Most of these cases involve the person being aware of the surrounding environment, but some experience severe pain and go on to have psychological problems.

The surgical tools didn't cause Weiher pain -- only pressure -- but the injections of a paralytic drug during the operation "felt like ignited fuel," she said. "I thought, well, maybe I've been wrong about my life, and I'm in hell," she said. The entire surgery lasted five-and-a-half hours. Sometime during it she either passed out or fell unconscious under the anesthetic. When she awoke, she began to scream.

"All I could say to anyone was, 'I was awake! I was awake!' " she said.

The use of general anesthesia is normally safe and produces a state of sedation that doesn't break in the middle of a procedure, doctors say. The patient and anesthesiologist collect as much medical history as possible beforehand, including alcohol and drug habits, to help determine the most appropriate anesthetic.

You may think of it as "going to sleep," but in terms of what your body is doing, general anesthesia has very little in common with taking a nap.

During sleep, the brain is in its most active state; anesthesia, on the other hand, depresses central nervous system activity. On the operating table, your brain is less active and consumes less oxygen -- a state of unconsciousness nothing like normal sleep.

Doctors do not know exactly how general anesthesia produces this effect. It is clear that anesthetic drugs interfere with the transmission of chemicals in the brain across the membranes, or walls, of cells. But the mechanism is the subject of ongoing research, Dr. Alexander Hannenberg, anesthesiologist in Newton, Massachusetts, and president of the American Society of Anesthesiologists.

Patients who remember falling unconscious under the anesthesia generally have a pleasant experience of it, Hannenberg said, and the period of "waking up" is also a relaxed state, Hannenberg said. Anesthesia awareness may relate to human error or equipment failure in delivering the anesthetic, Hannenberg said.

There are patients for whom doctors err on the side of a lower dose because of the nature of their condition, Hannenberg said. Someone who is severely injured and has lost a lot of blood, a patient with compromised cardiac function, or a woman who needs an emergency Caesarean section would all be at risk for serious side effects of high doses of anesthetic.

Heart or lung problems, daily alcohol consumption, and long-term use of opiates and other drugs may put patients at higher risk for anesthesia awareness, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Weiher started a campaign called the Anesthesia Awareness Campaign that seeks to educate people about the perils of waking up during surgery. She has spoken with about 4,000 people worldwide who have also had anesthesia awareness experiences.

The American Society of Anesthesiologists is engaged in an Anesthesia Awareness Registry, a research project through the University of Washington to examine cases of the phenomenon. One of the goals of the Anesthesia Awareness Campaign is to make brain activity monitoring a standard of care.

There has been controversy about the use of brain function monitors in general anesthesia. Advocates such as Dr. Barry Friedberg, anesthesiologist and founder of the nonprofit Goldilocks Anesthesia Foundation, say brain monitoring is essential for ensuring the patient achieves the appropriate sedation so as to not wake up. The monitors use a scale of 0 to 100 to reflect what's going on in the brain: 0 is a total absence of brain activity, 98 to 100 is wide awake, and 45 to 60 is about where general anesthesia puts the patient, Friedberg said.

But a 2008 study in the New England Journal of Medicine found no benefit in using brain function monitoring to prevent anesthesia awareness. The American Society of Anesthesiology has said the monitoring is not routinely indicated for general anesthesia, but may have some value and be appropriate for specific patients. The downsides are that they are expensive, and should not be used in place of heart rate and breathing signals when regulating the anesthesia.

Research does not consistently demonstrate a benefit from using brain function monitors, and the decision to use them should be made on an individual basis, Hannenberg said.

The anesthesiologist carefully monitors the patient's breathing and blood pressure, which can rise and fall, while the person is under the anesthetic, Hannenberg said. The treatment is tailored to the patient -- a young, healthy athlete will tolerate fluctuations in blood pressure better than someone with a serious condition, Hannenberg said.

As with surgical procedures themselves, anesthesia can result in stroke, heart attack and death. Such complications are more likely in people who have serious medical problems, and elderly people. Over the last two decades, anesthesiologists have made significant strides in reducing those risks, Hannenberg said.

A 6-year-old boy in Richmond, Virginia, recently died after going into cardiac arrest during a routine dental procedure that involved general anesthesia, CNN affiliate WTVR reported. Weiher had to have subsequent surgeries, including an operation on her other eye and a hysterectomy, and the experiences were terrifying. She is still taking medication for post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of her anesthesia awareness experience.

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Men are our competitors. We want less of those around. Women are our prey. We want them poor and helpless.

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Chinese men smoke cigarettes, have bad teeth, and a small dick; African men have pimples, diabetes, and a soft dick; but we are most civilized and have a big dick.

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British paedophile gets life sentence for Malaysia, Cambodia crimes

British paedophile Richard Huckle was sentenced to life in prison by a London court on Monday for abusing 23 Malaysian and Cambodian babies and children over almost a decade.

Huckle, 30, stood in the dock at London’s Old Bailey court with his hands clasped together as if in prayer as he was told that he would have to serve at least 23 years behind bars for his crimes against victims aged 6 months to 11 years.

“It is very rare indeed that a judge has to sentence sexual offending by one person on such a scale as this,” judge Peter Rook said.

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Butea superba

Butea Superba is a tuber vegetable that looks visibly similar to Pueraria Mirifica yet appears to be opposite in effect. This tuber has traditionally been used for the enhancement of male vitality and as an aphrodisiac in Thailand, and appears to be a source of androgenic compounds.

When studies investigated the androgenic effects, there appears to be the classical signs of direct androgenic activation (particularly, an increase in liver enzymes in some studies and growth of male sex organs; a decrease in testosterone levels in serum has been noted possibly due to negative feedback) but unlike its sister herb (Pueraria Mirifica) the bioactives mediating these androgenic effects are not currently known nor are their potencies relative to testosterone known.

Low doses of Butea Superba appear to be safe for human consumption, based on limited evidence, although higher doses have been connected to mutagenicity in mice (300-1000mg/kg, a human equivalent of 48mg/kg or above) and as such are not advisable.

Both studies on Butea Superba and its erectogenic effects appear to have their flaws, so although this herb could potentially be an erectogenic aid it is currently not proven to do so.

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Islamize Europe and get women out of politics. Feminism is the root if terrorism

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Men are our competitors. We want less of those around. Women are our prey. We want them poor and helpless.

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N.J. woman who provided fatal silicone penis enlargement procedure gets five years in prison

Kasia Rivera could also be deported to her native Jamaica under the sentence imposed Monday.

N.J. WOMAN ACCUSED IN FATAL PENIS PROCEDURE FACES NEW CHARGE

The 38-year-old East Orange woman had pleaded guilty in September to reckless manslaughter, shortly before her trial was to start. She admitted delivering the silicone injection that killed Justin Street in 2011.

Authorities say the 22-year-old East Orange man went to Rivera’s home so she could inject his penis with silicone, which he hoped would enlarge it. But the silicone she used wasn’t the kind used for medical procedures, and it caused an embolism which killed him.

Rivera acknowledged that she wasn’t a trained doctor or licensed to administer the injection.

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Don't bother whether your sex is legal or illegal. Just go for it. Because the eternal life of your soul depends on whether your sex is good enough on earth.

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It's not that we would be madly in love with Donald Trump. But at least, he's not a feminist. Now that is something to vote for.

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Botox Might Benefit Men with Erectile Dysfunction (ED)

International Society for Sexual Medicine

Although more research is needed, injections of onabotulinum toxin A – Botox – could be a viable therapy for men with erectile dysfunction (ED), according to a recent commentary in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

The approach “represents a promising avenue for future experimental and clinical research for the treatment of ED,” the authors noted.

Botox, developed from a neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum, is sometimes used to treat excessive sweating, overactive bladder, and chronic migraine, among other conditions. It is also used cosmetically, to smooth wrinkles. The drug weakens targeted muscles and nerves.

So far, studies on Botox for ED include an animal study and a small pilot study involving twelve men. However, the encouraging results could make Botox a path to explore.

Other treatments for ED are available, but they are not appropriate for all men. For example, phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors are not safe for men who take nitrates because the interaction can cause a dangerous drop in blood pressure. Also, many men do not respond to the drugs.

Self-injections are another option, but the idea makes some men squeamish. And vacuum devices, activated by a special pump, can be cumbersome.

It is thought that Botox could help smooth muscle tissue relax and, in turn, allow more blood to flow into the penis, creating a rigid erection.

“The ability to decrease the tone of resistance vessels, increase resting blood flow, and inhibit the persistent cavernosal smooth muscle tone might allow many men currently with ED or in some men unresponsive to oral or injectable agents to respond to less invasive therapy or perhaps require no therapy at all,” the authors explained.

Botox injections could be effective for several months.

The drug does have side effects, however. Flu-like symptoms, nausea, and headaches are possible. Also, since Botox is made from the toxin that causes botulism, a type of food poisoning, it’s important that patients receive very small doses.

Experts caution that although this represents a promising area of treatment, until the safety and efficacy can be further studied, it should only be performed in clinical trials under the supervision of an institutional review board. Patients should be cautioned about seeking this treatment outside of a clinical trial, as it has the potential to result in a prolonged erection which may permanently damage the penis.

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The Bangkok YanheeHospital has been offering penis enlargement surgery for some time. The latest craze, however, are Botox injections into the penis. Prices are about 300 USD. Effects last half year.

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Judge: Rape facilitates a natural society where men are protectors

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